"All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights."
Article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, 1948

Comment Sudan

  • Shining the media spotlight elsewhere.

    In recent months organisations working on Sudan have become increasingly clear that the situation is dire.

    Khartoum has recently used cluster bombs against its own people, murder continues in Darfur despite the world assuming it is over, and clashes along the north-south border have spread until relations are in a state of war in all

    Read More
  • A Tale of Two Eleanors

    If Eleanor Roosevelt, the dynamic force behind the foundation of the United Nations, could see what is happening in Syria right now, no doubt she would weep. She would likely agree with Hillary Clinton, who last week called for Security Council unity to tackle the "horrific campaign of violence" that has "shocked the conscience of

    Read More
  • By Abeer Awooda, a journalist from Sudan

    Since 2003 when reports started leaking about the genocide in Darfur, the subject of Sudan became more central for the major players on the world stage.

    These revelations shook the world’s conscience into addressing the horror of what is being perpetrated there. Mindful of the events in 1994 in Rwanda, the international community

    Read More
  • Voice concerns over repatriation

    By Tajeldin Abdalla ADAM - A Sudanese journalist from Darfur, Taj has a special interest in topics relating to human rights, justice and humanitarian relief.

    Darfur’s refugees in eastern Chad spoke about their fears that the Sudanese authorities are working with their Chadian counterparts to repatriate them despite lack of security and peace in the battered region.

    Read More
  • This week Russia and China vetoed a United Nations resolution that was mildly critical of the Syrian regime’s violent suppression of internal dissent.

    It seems an understatement to suggest the international community is inconsistent in its response to massive human rights violations. 

    We live in a world where more people die at the hands of the tyrants who rule them

    Read More

Why Syria and not Sudan?

Shining the media spotlight elsewhere.

In recent months organisations working on Sudan have become increasingly clear that the situation is dire.

Khartoum has recently used cluster bombs against its own people, murder continues in Darfur despite the world assuming it is over, and clashes along the north-south border have spread until relations are in a state of war in all but name.

But media reports on Sudan remain sporadic at best, compared to almost daily full page coverage of the troubles in Syria.

There are obvious reasons for this. Turmoil in Syria is relatively new. Sudan’s troubles – so numerous, and going on for so long, suffers from media fatigue, to the point where, as one of Champollion’s clients recently argued in an opinion piece for the New Statesman, “the world assumes Darfur is over”.

But it isn’t. So it is up to organisations like our client Waging Peace to work with the media to alert people to what is going on. But how do you keep an issue on the radar – whether it is war in a far off country, or knife crime closer to home? Especially if, like our clients, you seek more informed interventions and debates about serious topics, rather than crude publicity stunts.

For the more serious and thoughtful organisations out there, a number of options do exist:

  1. Generate your own news – collate information only you have access to. Gather the stories of people you work to help, collect statistics, release a report, or conduct some polling on an issue relevant to your work. Our work with Platform51 for example identified that one in three women will take antidepressants at some time in their life.
  2. Look out for reactive news opportunities – the recent anniversary of the Darfur conflict was a chance for Waging Peace to draw attention to the ongoing situation in the country.
  3. Make yourself indispensable to journalists – you know more than others what is happening on the ground on the issues you work on. Brief journalists regularly. Show them you have access to people or information which may be crucial for stories they are writing. Hold events that journalists can be invited to attend or chair. Or, if possible, take a journalist on a trip to see a problem for themselves.